Neurodiagnostic Technologists

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About the Job

Conduct electroneurodiagnostic (END) tests such as electroencephalograms, evoked potentials, polysomnograms, or electronystagmograms. May perform nerve conduction studies.

It is also Called

  • Electroencephalograph Technician
  • Electroencephalograph Technologist
  • Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist
  • Neurodiagnostic Technologist
  • Polysomnographic Technologist

What They Do

  • Explain testing procedures to patients, answering questions or reassuring patients as needed.
  • Measure patients' body parts and mark locations where electrodes are to be placed.
  • Attach electrodes to patients using adhesives.
  • Monitor patients during tests or surgeries, using electroencephalographs (EEG), evoked potential (EP) instruments, or video recording equipment.
  • Conduct tests or studies such as electroencephalography (EEG), polysomnography (PSG), nerve conduction studies (NCS), electromyography (EMG), and intraoperative monitoring (IOM).
  • Indicate artifacts or interferences derived from sources outside of the brain, such as poor electrode contact or patient movement, on electroneurodiagnostic recordings.
  • Adjust equipment to optimize viewing of the nervous system.
  • Set up, program, or record montages or electrical combinations when testing peripheral nerve, spinal cord, subcortical, or cortical responses.
  • Measure visual, auditory, or somatosensory evoked potentials (EPs) to determine responses to stimuli.
  • Conduct tests to determine cerebral death, the absence of brain activity, or the probability of recovery from a coma.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Preparation Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in California was $47,940 with most people making between $31,060 and $72,950

Outlook

2.57%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 10,900 people in California. It is projected that there will be 13,700 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 280 openings due to growth and about 230 replacement openings for approximately 510 total annual openings.



California Career Resource Network