Environmental Engineers

Bookmark Print History Journal


    • Please sign in to view journal entries

Your Employment History in this Occupation

Please sign in to view Employment History

Please fill out the fields below to e-mail someone a link to this page

Please sign in to bookmark occupations

About the Job

Research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology.

It is also Called

  • Water Treatment Plant Engineer
  • Water Supply Engineer
  • Water Resources Engineer
  • Wastewater Treatment Engineer
  • Waste Management Engineer
  • Solid Waste Management Engineer
  • Solid Waste Engineer
  • Soil Engineer
  • Sewage Disposal Engineer
  • Sanitation Engineer
View All

What They Do

  • Write reports or articles for Web sites or newsletters related to environmental engineering issues.
  • Develop, implement, or manage plans or programs related to conservation or management of natural resources.
  • Request bids from suppliers or consultants.
  • Assess, sort, characterize, or pack known or unknown materials.
  • Provide administrative support for projects by collecting data, providing project documentation, training staff, or performing other general administrative duties.
  • Develop or present environmental compliance training or orientation sessions.
  • Inform company employees or other interested parties of environmental issues.
  • Provide environmental engineering assistance in network analysis, regulatory analysis, or planning or reviewing database development.
  • Assist in budget implementation, forecasts, or administration.
  • Prepare, maintain, or revise quality assurance documentation or procedures.


People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IRC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Working Conditions and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Additional Resources

Preparation Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).


In 2016, the average annual wage in California was $105,160 with most people making between $63,210 and $148,490


avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 7,100 people in California. It is projected that there will be 8,600 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 150 openings due to growth and about 200 replacement openings for approximately 350 total annual openings.