Elevator Installers and Repairers

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About the Job

Assemble, install, repair, or maintain electric or hydraulic freight or passenger elevators, escalators, or dumbwaiters.

It is also Called

  • Platform Power Technician
  • Installer
  • Hydraulic Elevator Constructor
  • Freight Elevator Erector
  • Escalator Service Mechanic
  • Escalator Mechanic
  • Escalator Installer
  • Elevator Worker
  • Elevator Troubleshooter
  • Elevator Technician
show all

What They Do

  • Assemble electrically powered stairs, steel frameworks, and tracks, and install associated motors and electrical wiring.
  • Operate elevators to determine power demands, and test power consumption to detect overload factors.
  • Cut prefabricated sections of framework, rails, and other components to specified dimensions.
  • Install electrical wires and controls by attaching conduit along shaft walls from floor to floor and pulling plastic-covered wires through the conduit.
  • Install outer doors and door frames at elevator entrances on each floor of a structure.
  • Assemble elevator cars, installing each car's platform, walls, and doors.
  • Bolt or weld steel rails to the walls of shafts to guide elevators, working from scaffolding or platforms.
  • Connect car frames to counterweights, using steel cables.
  • Attach guide shoes and rollers to minimize the lateral motion of cars as they travel through shafts.
  • Participate in additional training to keep skills up to date.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IA.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Artistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Working Conditions and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Equipment Selection - Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Preparation Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in California was $92,570 with most people making between $48,010 and $127,170

Outlook

3.75%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 1,600 people in California. It is projected that there will be 2,200 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 60 openings due to growth and about 20 replacement openings for approximately 80 total annual openings.