Flight Attendants

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About the Job

Provide personal services to ensure the safety, security, and comfort of airline passengers during flight. Greet passengers, verify tickets, explain use of safety equipment, and serve food or beverages.

It is also Called

  • Ramp Flight Attendant
  • Purser
  • Meal Attendant
  • Lead Instructor/Flight Attendant
  • International Flight Attendant
  • In-Flight Crew Member
  • Flight Steward
  • Flight Hostess
  • Flight Attendant/Inflight Supervisor
  • Flight Attendant/Inflight Manager
View All

What They Do

  • Sell alcoholic beverages to passengers.
  • Heat and serve prepared foods.
  • Collect money for meals and beverages.
  • Assist passengers in placing carry-on luggage in overhead, garment, or under-seat storage.
  • Conduct periodic trips through the cabin to ensure passenger comfort and to distribute reading material, headphones, pillows, playing cards, and blankets.
  • Inspect and clean cabins, checking for any problems and making sure that cabins are in order.
  • Prepare reports showing places of departure and destination, passenger ticket numbers, meal and beverage inventories, the conditions of cabin equipment, and any problems encountered by passengers.
  • Take inventory of headsets, alcoholic beverages, and money collected.
  • Answer passengers' questions about flights, aircraft, weather, travel routes and services, arrival times, or schedules.
  • Operate audio and video systems.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ESC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Enterprising interests, but also prefer Social and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Preparation Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in California was $48,640 with most people making between $26,760 and $73,820

Outlook

2.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 11,500 people in California. It is projected that there will be 13,800 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 230 openings due to growth and about 210 replacement openings for approximately 440 total annual openings.

Industries that Employ this Occupation

Industry breakdown is not available for this occupation