Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment

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About the Job

Wash or otherwise clean vehicles, machinery, and other equipment. Use such materials as water, cleaning agents, brushes, cloths, and hoses.

It is also Called

  • Wheel Cleaner
  • Water Filter Cleaner
  • Washroom Cleaner
  • Washer
  • Wash Worker
  • Wash Rack Operator
  • Wash and Greaser
  • Wagon Washer
  • Vehicle Washer
  • Vehicle and Equipment Cleaner
show all

What They Do

  • Fit boot spoilers, side skirts, or mud flaps to cars.
  • Transport materials, equipment, or supplies to or from work areas, using carts or hoists.
  • Lubricate machinery, vehicles, or equipment or perform minor repairs or adjustments, using hand tools.
  • Collect and test samples of cleaning solutions or vapors.
  • Connect hoses or lines to pumps or other equipment.
  • Pre-soak or rinse machine parts, equipment, or vehicles by immersing objects in cleaning solutions or water, manually or using hoists.
  • Clean the plastic work inside cars, using paintbrushes.
  • Drive vehicles to or from workshops or customers' workplaces or homes.
  • Disassemble and reassemble machines or equipment or remove and reattach vehicle parts or trim, using hand tools.
  • Sweep, shovel, or vacuum loose debris or salvageable scrap into containers and remove containers from work areas.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: I.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Preparation Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in California was $25,630 with most people making between $20,810 and $33,820

Outlook

1.25%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 51,100 people in California. It is projected that there will be 57,500 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 640 openings due to growth and about 1,780 replacement openings for approximately 2,420 total annual openings.